Monday, May 17, 2004

Productiveness

I sit here pondering the idea of being productive. Brian says he has been extremely productive and I would have to agree. I have also had an exceedingly productive day. I woke up late, but then went for a run around my neighborhood, cleaned my entire room of old stuff and am now fitting in all the stuff I care about from my room at school. Productive, yes. But, I really should start that paper that I have to write before leaving for Ireland. So, I wonder, is it really being productive to have gotten all this done, when something of greater priority still sits and gains dust? Procrastination or productiveness? This is the question I lay on the table.

4 comments:

Amy said...

Procrastination and productiveness have never been, and never will be, mutually exclusive concepts.

Words to live by (or "Words by which to live," if you care that much).

David said...

Excellent Amy: your nonterminal prepositions make the day cleave like butter.

Caryn, don't ponder so long that your procrastinative pondering precludes productivity.

Matt said...

Wow. Haha, you two should stop.

No seriously, stop, I feel dumb in the midst of your excellent grasp and manipulation of the English language.

And my dear Caryn, procrastination is what brings life joy. It is because of procrastination that you were given a lovely piece of rope and that Mark consumed nearly an entire case of Bawls. Procrastination gives us the moments we cherish most and it is because of procrastination that I must end this now and go to my interview before I am late. Fare thee well.

luke said...

Isn't it funny how a word can be its own antonym?
For example: cleave. Does David mean that Amy's nonterminal prepositions make the day join together as butter joins to itself, or that they make the day split apart as butter splits apart?
Another example is fast. If Caryn is a fast worker, does that mean that she works quickly, or that she is unmoving?

So the question is, Matt... would you inoculate(v. to protect/to infect) yourself (against/with) this language or root (v. to plant/to pull up by the root) yourself (in/from) it?
What a fix(n. solution/problem)!